Seborrheic Dermatitis Pictures

Jun 29 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Seborrheic Dermatitis?

Seborrheic dermatitis, otherwise known as seborrheic eczema is a common inflammatory skin disorder characterized by scaly, flaky, itchy red skin and persistent dandruff patterned especially on sebum-gland rich areas.

Seborrheic dermatitis is thought to be due to the contribution of yeast Malassezia, to the abnormal immune response. The yeast hydrolyzes sebum and releases toxic substances that cause skin irritation and inflammation.

Other causes include environmental changes, stress, genetics, Vitamin A, pyridoxine and riboflavin deficiencies, medications, hormonal imbalance, and abnormal immune response.

The clinical manifestations come out steadily, with dandruff as the usual first sign. It may occur on the scalp, face and on areas where skin folds, with areas becoming red, itchy and flaky.

Seborrheic dermatitis in infants is termed as cradle cap. It is not dangerous and is just a temporary condition. It comes out as thick, crusty, yellow scales over the infant’s scalp. When it happens in infants, the disorder will resolve itself within days and without any treatment.

Once you get this skin condition, it is likely to become persistent and there are no measures to stop it permanently. But there are a number of treatment options to control the symptoms. Applying medicated creams and lotions to the affected body areas is the mainstay measure. Topical corticosteroid is only for short-term use because of rebound effect which may promote dependence. Frequent shampooing ang longer periods of lathering can reduce dandruff.

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Keratosis Pilaris Pictures

Jun 26 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Keratosis Pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris is an autosomal dominant, genetic disorder of keratinization of hair follicles. Also termed as follicular karatosis, this is an extremely common benign condition that is manifested by the appearance of small, uneven folliculocentric keratotic bumps on the skin, often portrayed as chicken skin. Upon gross examination, it appears primarily on the back and the outer portions of the upper arms, facial cheeks, thighs and buttocks.

Globally, it affects more or less 40% of the adult population, and an estimated 50% to 80% of the adolescents.

This condition transpires once the human body produces too much natural protein called keratin. The undue protein which is cream colored, contains and entraps the hair follicles in the pore leading to the formation of hard plugs. The hard plugs inhibit the hair from exiting and reaching the surface, so it grows continuously being encapsulated inside the follicle and beneath the keratin debris. Rubbing the affected area will expose the coiled hair in a few instances. This condition endures only cosmetic consequences as it comes out as a proliferation of tiny hard lumps that are completely harmless. The disorder manifests as a diffused, irregular rash made of ten to 100, very small red bumps. When touched, the affected area seems to be like that of sandpaper in texture.

No cure or universally effective management is on hand. However there are a number of palliative treatment selections and skin care measures which need to be continuous. The effectiveness of the treatment recipe is absolutely associated to the person’s consistency. Bear in mind that these treatment options can only afford to give good temporary results. Some of these measures to avoid unwarranted skin dryness include the use of mild soap-less cleansers once or twice a day and regular skin lubrication. Other treatment methods for Keratosis Pilaris consist of topical exfoliants, topical corticosteroids and topical retinoids.

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Lipoma Pictures

Jun 23 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a benign tumor of the fat cells in a slim, fibrous capsule positioned just beneath the skin. It is acknowledged as the most common type of noncancerous soft tissue tumor. Lipomas can arise at any age, but these growths are most common in adult individuals aged 40 to 60 years old and very rare to occur in children.

The primary etiology is not yet established. A genetic involvement is possible which involves a gene rearrangement of chromosome 12. Assumption exists concerning a feasible association between blunt blow trauma and subsequent growth of lipoma.

Most of the lipomas are small, usually about 1 cm to 3 cm in diameter but can increase to sizes over and above 6 cm. But in most of the cases, the growth remains the same size over years or grows gradually. They are usually painless and have a soft, rubbery texture. A lipoma is easy to recognize as it moves promptly with minor finger pressure. They could emerge almost anywhere but these dome-shaped growths are most frequent to appear on the trunk, neck, shoulder, armpits, upper thigh and arms.

Generally, lipomas need not to be removed. Treatment is not necessary as lipomas are not cancerous. If in case the growth becomes painful and sore, cyclically gets to be infected or inflamed, empties an offensive-smelling discharge, expands in dimension or becomes cosmetically unappealing, a surgical removal is considered necessary. Treatment selections aside from surgical removal include the use of steroid injections to shrink the tumor and liposuction to remove fatty lumps.

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Rosacea Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a very common erythematous, acne-like chronic dermatological condition that affects an estimated 45 million people worldwide.

Still, there is no particular cause that can sufficiently explain the pathogenesis of this disorder. It could be a pattern of genetic predisposition and environmental factors that has caused for it to arise. There is also a link connecting the condition to mites, sun exposure, medications that may cause blood vessel dilation, gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori.

The major clinical symptoms of rosacea consist of red patches, development of telangiectases, which are small blood vessels that form just under the skin surface, diffuse facial redness, red cysts, and pink or irritated eyes. These manifestations tend appear, then disappear for weeks, months or even years and then reappear.

It frequently begins with a tendency to go red much more easily than other people do. In time, individuals may see irreversible redness on the face.

Characteristically, the nose can become red and bumpy and develop visible dilated superficial blood vessels. If left untreated, later stages can bring a disfiguring nasal condition called rhinophyma, a condition described by a bulbous, enlarged red nose and puffy cheeks.

Currently, rosacea isn’t regarded as a curable disorder, but it can usually be managed with appropriate, standard treatments. With lasers, intense pulse light, photodynamic therapy and isotretinoin made available, some cases of this condition may be drastically cleared for a long time.

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Basal Cell Carcinoma Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

The most common type of skin cancer is the basal cell carcinoma. It is a type of non-melanocytic skin cancer that takes place from basal cells and accounts for approximately 75% of all skin cancer cases. Metastasis and mortality are rare, yet, it can bring considerable damage and disfigurement by invading proximate tissues of the eyes, ears or nose. Fair-skinned people with a family history of thus cancer are mainly affected.

Two thirds of the cases involves sunlight exposure as a significant factor, which confirms why tumors develop typically on sun-exposed areas such as the face, scalp, neck, torso, back, and legs. Exposure to sunlight leads to the formation of thymine dimmers which is DNA damage. Another risk factor is exposure to ultraviolet waves in tanning booths.

A basal cell carcinoma may appear at first as a little, shiny, semi-transparent dome-shaped tumor with rolled margins frequently covered by small, superficial blood vessels termed as telangiectases. Some basal cell carcinomas include melanin pigment causing a brown pigmentation. The open sore may bleed and heal again and again.

To make an accurate diagnosis, a shave biopsy is performed. A sample of the affected skin is taken out and is viewed under magnification to verify presence of cancer cells.

The modes of treatment adjust conditional on the size, level of penetration, and location of the basal cell tumor. Excision takes the cancer out. In curettage and electrodessication, the tumor is scraped away and electricity destroys any remaining cancerous cells. If the cancer has metastasized to organs or lymph nodes or in such cases when surgery cannot treat the cancer, radiation is desirable. If the basal cell carcinoma is under the superficial type, then topical creams with Imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil may be prescribed by the physician.

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