Acne Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Acne?

Acne is a skin condition characterized by minor, although infrequently serious, skin eruptions due to inflammation around the sebaceous glands. It is most prominent on the face, chest, arms and back. Roughly about 85% of all people have acne outbreaks in some point in their lives.

Normally, the sebaceous glands produce a fatty, oily substance known as sebum, to protect and lubricate the skin. Acne results when the sebum flow is obstructed by dead skin cells, dried sebum or by bacteria. When there is a complete blockage, whitehead is produced. When the blockage is incomplete, blackhead results. In time, the clogged hair follicle enlarges, producing a bump. The follicles continue to enlarge until the walls rupture, permitting the normal skin bacteria to enter into the deeper layer of the skin. This will result to an inflammation. If the inflammation is close to the surface, this is termed as pustule, pimple for deeper inflammation and much deeper is called cyst.

Remove excess oil by regular gentle washing of the face with non-irritating unscented soaps. However, avoid vigorous washing and scrubbing as these may irritate the skin, making the acne worse. The use of over-the-counter preparations and topical solutions with benzoyl peroxide improves acne. If the acne is severe, dermatologists may prescribe topical and oral antibiotics. If the patient has drug-resistance to antibiotics, Accutane may be used as a substitute. If acne is fully managed, scars can be dealt with resurfacing derma procedure called dermabrasion. Except in severe cases where the skin eruption is widespread, normally acne is undisruptive and responds well to treatment.

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Eczema Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Eczema?

Eczema is a general term used for common inflammatory dermatological conditions. The most constant features of eczema which are associated to significant amounts of histamine on the skin are pruritus and hyperirritability. Because of the alteration in the lipid content, sebaceous gland activity and sweating, too much dryness with consequential itching develops. This leads to crusting, flaking, cracking and bleeding of the skin. In reaction to skin rubbing, instant redness comes out on the skin. Scratching exposes a healing lesion which may increase the rash. Over time, burning cracks become visible.

The common classifications of eczema are atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, xerotic eczema and seborrheic dermatitis. Atopic eczema is an allergic disease with a hereditary element. Contact dermatitis is a cell-mediated skin sensitivity which results from a direct exosure with a chemical or allergen. A very common skin disorder among the older population is xerotic eczema where the skin becomes so dehydrated it turns into eczema. This type of eczema gets worse in dry winter conditions. Seborrheic dermatitis is a skin condition directly related to dandruff. There is dry and oily flaking in the scalp, face and eyebrows.

Eczema can be genetically inherited but still there is no exact cause but a defect of the skin weakens its role as a barrier. Some people have more than one gene defect leading to abnormalities in proteins which are known to be essential in maintaining skin integrity. Some forms of eczema can be triggered by environmental allergens direct contact with irritants, temperature, humidity, and psychological stress.

The course of action for the treatment of eczema includes decreasing irritation and scratching, lubricating the skin and preventing secondary infections. Individuals should stay away from allergenic substances such as harsh soaps and detergents. Scratching the affected area must be avoided since it will just worsen the condition ang may spread the irritation. Keep the fingernails short and clean. To prevent it from being scratched, it is effective to cover the area with clothing or sterile bandage. If exposed to allergenic substances, immediate washing of the exposed area with soap ang running water can remove the irritating chemical. To soothe the skin, intermittently apply wet compresses for short periods. OTC corticosteroid creams and oral antihistamines can help to relieve the intense itching. If secondary bacterial infection develops, antibiotics may well be needed.

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