Squamous Cell Carcinoma Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinoma is a common, yet histologically-distinct skin cancer that starts when there is an uninhibited multiplication of malignant squamous cells, which normally are fine, flat cells that look like scales under magnification. These cells are located in the tissue that forms the skin surface, the respiratory and digestive tracts and lining of hollow organs. The incidence increases with age with an average peak incidence at 66 years old.

Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from tanning beds is the primary reason for the majority of the cases of this cancer. Other factors that can play a role to the development of squamous cell carcinoma are old age, family history, weak immunity, xeroderma pigmentosum, smoking and skin injury.

In this type of cancer, there is a relatively slow-growing bump that possesses a rough and scaly red patches located commonly on the face, neck, arms and hands and other sun-exposed areas. The lesion may appear as a hard plaque with small blood vessels. In addition, there is an irregular bleeding from the tumor, particularly on the lips.

The treatment is dependent on the tumor’s size and anatomical location, the number and the surgeon’s preference. Usually, the treatment is curative. In fact, if this is correctly treated, the cure percentage is about 95%. Squamous cell carcinomas are usually removed surgically via simple excision. Freezing with liquid nitrogen is a successful option for very small squamous cell carcinomas. If the carcinoma is larger than 2 centimeters, the most effective treatment is the Mohs surgery. If the patient has larger tumors, or is situated in a more challenging location, diagnostic tests such as ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI to determine the degree of involvement and metastasis. If it is metastatic, radiotherapy might be the choice of treatment.

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Herpes Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Herpes?

Herpes simplex is a sexually transmitted viral disease caused either by Herpes simplex virus type and type 2. The categorization into various distinct disorders is based on the site of viral infection.

The virus rotates between episodes of active disease where blisters holding the infectious virus particles appear persisting for about 2 to 21 days. The first period of this disease is typically worse than recurrences that appear in a while. The principal clinical manifestation of herpes is an attack of painful, irritating lesions on and around the reproductive organs or on or by the lips.

This is followed by a remission phase. Subsequent to the preliminary infection, the herpes viruses move all along the path to the ganglion where they become dormant and exist there for lifetime. Individuals can expect an outbreak if a tingling sensation is felt. During this time, they are acutely contagious even if the skin looks natural. Classically, the sores entirely heal but resurface at some time in the future when least anticipated. The reasons as to why the infection recurs are indefinite while a few possible triggers have been recognized together with the use of immunosuppressant medications, excessive sunlight exposure, hyperthermia, stress, acute illness, and weakened immune system.

The virus is easily transmitted by skin-to-skin contact with an active lesion or even with visibly normal skin but is shedding virus, kissing, or body secretions of an infected person. When the blisters have dried up and crusted over, the danger of infectivity is drastically lessened. To infect an individual, the virus penetrates through small breaks or even microscopic injury in the skin or mucous membrane sufficient enough to allow viral entry.

The most dependable technique to avoid the risk of herpes spread is by means of barrier protection. Limiting the number of sexual partners into one is another move toward prevention knowing that the chances of getting infected rises with the number of sexual partners an individual has.

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