Cold Sores Pictures

Jun 29 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What are Cold Sores?

Medically known as orolabial herpes, fever blisters or cold sores are tiny, painful, erythematous-based clusters of grouped vesicles that come out on the lips that are caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). The herpes simplex virus can easily penetrate the body via cracks in the skin around the mouth. The virus can be transmitted through sharing of eating utensils, kissing and touching the affected individual’s saliva.

A premonitory symptom of a tingling and burning pain heralds the appearance of the fluid-filled blisters by up to a day. They are typically limited to the mouth area, but they can still occur on the nose, chin and cheeks. After the sores emerge, they typically burst open leading to a clear fluid leakage. After it becomes dry, it crust over and fades away after two weeks at most. Some individuals may carry the herpes virus but they don’t get the condition.

Prevention is the best way to keep away from getting the viral infection. Avoid sharing eating utensils, drinking cups or any other personal items to any person. Avoid being exposed to body fluids of an infected individual.

Orolabial herpes usually heal on their own just within several days. Be cautious not to use topical creams with steroids as they exacerbate manifestations. There are more than a few medications available that can reduce the period or symptoms of fever blisters. Treatment options include topical Acyclovir creams, ointments and other prescription-strength topical antiviral medications.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinoma is a common, yet histologically-distinct skin cancer that starts when there is an uninhibited multiplication of malignant squamous cells, which normally are fine, flat cells that look like scales under magnification. These cells are located in the tissue that forms the skin surface, the respiratory and digestive tracts and lining of hollow organs. The incidence increases with age with an average peak incidence at 66 years old.

Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from tanning beds is the primary reason for the majority of the cases of this cancer. Other factors that can play a role to the development of squamous cell carcinoma are old age, family history, weak immunity, xeroderma pigmentosum, smoking and skin injury.

In this type of cancer, there is a relatively slow-growing bump that possesses a rough and scaly red patches located commonly on the face, neck, arms and hands and other sun-exposed areas. The lesion may appear as a hard plaque with small blood vessels. In addition, there is an irregular bleeding from the tumor, particularly on the lips.

The treatment is dependent on the tumor’s size and anatomical location, the number and the surgeon’s preference. Usually, the treatment is curative. In fact, if this is correctly treated, the cure percentage is about 95%. Squamous cell carcinomas are usually removed surgically via simple excision. Freezing with liquid nitrogen is a successful option for very small squamous cell carcinomas. If the carcinoma is larger than 2 centimeters, the most effective treatment is the Mohs surgery. If the patient has larger tumors, or is situated in a more challenging location, diagnostic tests such as ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI to determine the degree of involvement and metastasis. If it is metastatic, radiotherapy might be the choice of treatment.

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Rosacea Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a very common erythematous, acne-like chronic dermatological condition that affects an estimated 45 million people worldwide.

Still, there is no particular cause that can sufficiently explain the pathogenesis of this disorder. It could be a pattern of genetic predisposition and environmental factors that has caused for it to arise. There is also a link connecting the condition to mites, sun exposure, medications that may cause blood vessel dilation, gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori.

The major clinical symptoms of rosacea consist of red patches, development of telangiectases, which are small blood vessels that form just under the skin surface, diffuse facial redness, red cysts, and pink or irritated eyes. These manifestations tend appear, then disappear for weeks, months or even years and then reappear.

It frequently begins with a tendency to go red much more easily than other people do. In time, individuals may see irreversible redness on the face.

Characteristically, the nose can become red and bumpy and develop visible dilated superficial blood vessels. If left untreated, later stages can bring a disfiguring nasal condition called rhinophyma, a condition described by a bulbous, enlarged red nose and puffy cheeks.

Currently, rosacea isn’t regarded as a curable disorder, but it can usually be managed with appropriate, standard treatments. With lasers, intense pulse light, photodynamic therapy and isotretinoin made available, some cases of this condition may be drastically cleared for a long time.

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Impetigo Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Impetigo?

Impetigo is a common, superficial, extremely infectious bacterial infection of the skin generally caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, staphylococcus aureus or by multiple bacteria.

The mode of transmission is via direct contact with lesions and with nasal carriers. Dried streptococci suspended in the air are not transmittable to the intact skin. The period of incubation is 1 to 3 days. It is very contagious and infection may spread from one body area to other exposed areas of the body and may infect other people sharing with them their clothing, linen, towels, combs and other personal belongings soiled with exudates.

At first, the lesions appear as small, red pustules which quickly become isolated, thin-walled vesicles which will soon rupture leaving a denuded area that discharges a honey-like serous liquid. After it hardens on the skin surface, they become covered with stuck-on golden yellow crusts. Removing the crust will expose the smooth, red, moist surface on which new crust will form again.

There are two categories of impetigo namely bullous impetigo and non-bullous impetigo. Bullous impetigo involves larger fluid-containing vesicles that is clear at first and then becomes hazy. The most widespread type of impetigo is the non-bullous. In reverse to bullous impetigo, the blisters in non-bullous are tiny. These blisters will burst open in the end leaving a raw patch of red skin that suppurates fluid. Steadily, a honey-yellow coating coats the area.

Frequent hand washing and other good hygiene measures can facilitate prevention. Take baths regularly and clean the skin with mild soap and water. Prevent spreading the infection among members of the family by using a separate towel. Separate the infected individual’s personal belongings and wash the items in hot water. Other members who are not infected should pay special care to areas of the skin with impaired integrity and keep it clean and protected from getting infected. Persons who have impetigo are advised to stay indoors for a few days.

If the affected area is extensive and there is a concern about complications, then systemic antibiotic therapy is the usual treatment. Oral penicillin may be prescribed to patients with nonbullous impetigo. Penicillinase-resistant penicillins are recommended to patients who have bullous impetigo. If the patient has previous allergic reaction to penicillin, erythromycin is a useful substitute. If the disease is just limited to a small area, a topical antibiotic may be prescribed. An alternative to topical antibiotics is hydrogen peroxide.

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Basal Cell Carcinoma Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

The most common type of skin cancer is the basal cell carcinoma. It is a type of non-melanocytic skin cancer that takes place from basal cells and accounts for approximately 75% of all skin cancer cases. Metastasis and mortality are rare, yet, it can bring considerable damage and disfigurement by invading proximate tissues of the eyes, ears or nose. Fair-skinned people with a family history of thus cancer are mainly affected.

Two thirds of the cases involves sunlight exposure as a significant factor, which confirms why tumors develop typically on sun-exposed areas such as the face, scalp, neck, torso, back, and legs. Exposure to sunlight leads to the formation of thymine dimmers which is DNA damage. Another risk factor is exposure to ultraviolet waves in tanning booths.

A basal cell carcinoma may appear at first as a little, shiny, semi-transparent dome-shaped tumor with rolled margins frequently covered by small, superficial blood vessels termed as telangiectases. Some basal cell carcinomas include melanin pigment causing a brown pigmentation. The open sore may bleed and heal again and again.

To make an accurate diagnosis, a shave biopsy is performed. A sample of the affected skin is taken out and is viewed under magnification to verify presence of cancer cells.

The modes of treatment adjust conditional on the size, level of penetration, and location of the basal cell tumor. Excision takes the cancer out. In curettage and electrodessication, the tumor is scraped away and electricity destroys any remaining cancerous cells. If the cancer has metastasized to organs or lymph nodes or in such cases when surgery cannot treat the cancer, radiation is desirable. If the basal cell carcinoma is under the superficial type, then topical creams with Imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil may be prescribed by the physician.

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