Squamous Cell Carcinoma Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinoma is a common, yet histologically-distinct skin cancer that starts when there is an uninhibited multiplication of malignant squamous cells, which normally are fine, flat cells that look like scales under magnification. These cells are located in the tissue that forms the skin surface, the respiratory and digestive tracts and lining of hollow organs. The incidence increases with age with an average peak incidence at 66 years old.

Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from tanning beds is the primary reason for the majority of the cases of this cancer. Other factors that can play a role to the development of squamous cell carcinoma are old age, family history, weak immunity, xeroderma pigmentosum, smoking and skin injury.

In this type of cancer, there is a relatively slow-growing bump that possesses a rough and scaly red patches located commonly on the face, neck, arms and hands and other sun-exposed areas. The lesion may appear as a hard plaque with small blood vessels. In addition, there is an irregular bleeding from the tumor, particularly on the lips.

The treatment is dependent on the tumor’s size and anatomical location, the number and the surgeon’s preference. Usually, the treatment is curative. In fact, if this is correctly treated, the cure percentage is about 95%. Squamous cell carcinomas are usually removed surgically via simple excision. Freezing with liquid nitrogen is a successful option for very small squamous cell carcinomas. If the carcinoma is larger than 2 centimeters, the most effective treatment is the Mohs surgery. If the patient has larger tumors, or is situated in a more challenging location, diagnostic tests such as ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI to determine the degree of involvement and metastasis. If it is metastatic, radiotherapy might be the choice of treatment.

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Cellulitis Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Cellulitis?

Cellulitis is the most familiar cause of limb swelling. The connective tissues are diffusely inflamed with serious inflammation of the dermal and subcutaneous layers of the skin. It happens when an entry point through the first line of skin barriers has been injured permitting the normal microflora or exogenous bacteria commonly the Group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus to penetrate and release toxins in the tissues. This is non-contagious since the infection is limited to the deeper layers of the skin and the epidermis provides a cover over the infection.

The predisposing factors for cellulitis include bites, blistering, skin damage, severe acne, chicken pox, tinea pedis, tattooing, pruritic skin rash, recent surgical operation, dry skin, puncture wounds or in any ways that break the skin.

Old age, weakened immune system and diabetes are especially more at risk to contracting the disease than the general population. Because of the impairment of blood circulation in the legs leading to foot ulcers in diabetic patients, they are markedly prone to feet cellulitis. Poor management of blood glucose levels tolerates the bacteria to multiply at speed in the affected tissue and facilitates swift progression as infection goes through the lymph nodes and bloodstream.

This bacterial skin infection usually starts as a small area of inflammation that extends to neighboring skin areas. As the tender area begins to expand, the sick person develops hyperthermia, sometimes with chills and sweats, and swollen lymph nodes.

The affected individual is asked to elevate the involved area above the hear level. Every 2 to 4 hours, warm, moist packs are applied to the affected site. In mild cases of cellulitis, the treatment can be on an outpatient basis using oral antibiotic therapy. If severe, hospitalization is required and treated with an antibiotic intravenously with duration of 7 to 14 days.

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