Hidradenitis Suppurativa Pictures

Jun 26 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Hidradenitis Suppurativa?

Hidradenitis Suppurativa is a rare chronic inflammatory skin condition described by engorged, painful, inflamed lesions which can be the same in size with a pimple or as large as golf balls in the armpit, groin and other areas where apocrine glands are concentrated. The disease is an infection of the cutaneous apocrine glands which may extend to adjacent subcutaneous tissues and fascia.

There isn’t much in-depth study made about Hidradenitis Suppurativa. It is an orphan illness as it is considered to be very rare that no pharmaceutical companies would dare to engage in a challenge to obtain a reasonable cure. What we know is that it believed to arise when the apocrine gland channels become obstructed by excessive perspiration. The secretions are confined in the glands forcing sweat and bacteria into the surrounding tissues leading to subcutaneous inflammation and bacterial infection.

The patient with this non-contagious condition displays groups of unremitting abscesses, sebaceous cyst and multiple localized infections that are considerably painful which culminates in incision and pus drainage often leaving an open wound that will not heal. As suppuration advances, immediate cellulitis may exist. When the multiple nodules have come together, they become bordered by fibrotic reactions which result in an unsightly appearance of a scarred area.

Usually, the initial treatments include oral and topical antibiotics in addition to anti-inflammatory pills, systemic steroids, retinoids, birth control pills and the use of intra-lesional injections to reduce swelling. Strictly avoid wearing fitting clothing and shaving the affected area. The areas should be washed daily using an antibacterial soap. If severe, aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and incision and draining are recommended.

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Dermatitis Herpetiformis Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

Dermatitis Herpetiformis, otherwise known as Duhring’s disease, is a chronic autoimmune blistering dermatological condition characterized by clustered excoriations, urticaria and vesicles located on the elbows, knees, back and buttocks. As the name suggests, the inflammation is similar to herpes, but it is not related to herpes virus. It was Dr. Louis Duhring who originally described the disease in the year 1884 at the University of Pennsylvania.

The papulovesicular eruptions are intensely itchy and chronic distributed symmetrically on extensor surfaces. This condition also involves the appearance of a rash. The rash results when gluten joins with IgA, both enter the bloodstream and circulates in the system and finally, gluten and IgA clog up the small blood vessels in the skin. This will draw neutrophils and release chemicals which really produce the rash. At first, the person will notice a slight pigmentation at the site where the lesions come out. Then later it will become vesicles that occur in groups.

Dermatitis herpetiformis responds well to Dapsone. For most patients, this drug is an effective treatment that will improve the disease in just a few days. It responds so quickly that itching is significantly reduced in two to three days. However, when the damage has reached the gastrointestinal tract, this pharmacological treatment has no effect.

To help control the disease, a strict gluten-free diet should be observed as lifetime management. This modification can radically decrease related intestinal damage and other complications.

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Hives Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What are Hives?

Hives are common skin disorders characterized by edematous plaques with severe itching. Classically, it appears as pallid red, raised, itchy bumps. Each hive remains for a few minutes to several hours before disappearing. For hours or days, clusters of these lesions may come, go, and return episodically. It can be acute when it persists less than six weeks or chronic when the sequence continues longer than six weeks. Acute urticaria accounts for the majority of the cases. Chronic urticaria is idiopathic in nature, rarely caused by an allergic reaction.

In urticaria, whether the activator is allergic or non-allergic, a complex release of inflammatory mediators is involved. One of the chemicals released from the cutaneous mast cells during the process is histamine, which causes escape of fluid from the superficial blood vessels.

Urticaria begins as red circular rashes and soon become pale and edematous which comes with an intense itching and burning sensation. Characteristically, hives rapidly change in size, moving anywhere from one are to another, disappearing and reappearing in matters of hours.

In the environment, numerous substances can cause hives including: medications, food, and physical agents which are aquagenic, stress-related, cholinergic, dermatographic, adrenergic, parasitic or temperamental.

Early identification and avoidance of the allergic triggers are the best ways to prevent another urticaria attack. If exposed to a trigger, have a preventive dose of antihistamine to inhibit hives from developing. Diphenhydramine is considered most effective non-sedating antihistamine. If the urticaria is severe, oral corticosteroids are given for short time only. Starch and colloid-type baths are used as comfort measures. In patients who experience angioedema of the respiratory tract, the doctor may counsel to bring a prescription of epinephrine.

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Ringworm Pictures

Jun 19 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Ringworm?

Ringworm or Dermatophytosis is a very common skin disease caused by several different fungal infections collectively known as tinea. The term ringworm originates from the early belief that the disease was caused by a parasitic worm which is untrue. The lifetime risk of an individual to develop this superficial fungal disease is between 20 to 30%.

Ringworm Symptoms

  • The infection causes flaking, ring-shaped, itchy red patches that develop on various parts that could erupt and ooze. The patches often have sharply-defined borders growing to nearly one inch crossways. They are frequently redder around the outside with clear tone in the middle. This forms the manifestation of a ring wherein the infection remains active.
  • There are hairless patches and scales on the scalp, and scratchy, scaling irritation under a beard.
  • Nails thicken, become discolored, crusty and rough and could even crumble.
  • There is dry scaling and fissuring of the skin between the toes.
  • The groin is a usual area of infection. Usually on the inner area of the upper thigh, scaly, red-brown patches develop.

Ringworm Causes

Naturally, bacteria and fungi live on our bodies. A number of these microorganisms are helpful while others are opportunistic, multiply in haste to form contagious diseases. When a specific fungus thrives and multiplies anywhere, ringworm arises. The mode of transmission is via direct skin-to-skin contact, and contact with inanimate, personal objects. Exposure to infected animals is one mode of transmission. In very uncommon cases, infection can be attributed to exposure to infected soil. If the soil does have ample nutrients, the fungus that causes ringworm in humans can survive for an extended period of time. Still, for a person to become infected in this mode, the individual would have to have prolonged contact with harshly contaminated soil or else the odds are thin.

Ringworm Treatment

Individuals with ringworm respond well to self-care treatment. They are advised to keep their affected skin as clean and dry as possible. If it starts to erupt, apply damp compress to clear out the area. Use OTC antifungal powders, creams and lotions especially those containing ketoconazole, clotrimazole, terbinafine and miconazole. These are generally used once or twice a day. Infection begins to disappear within a week. With continued application for the recommended amount of time will guarantee the total eradication of the fungal infection.

When there is a severe or persistent infection and OTC treatments fail, it may require treatment by a physician. Antifungal oral agents may be given.

If there is ring worm on the groin, the individual should wear cotton underwear and change it more than once per day. If there is athlete’s foot, change the socks frequently to keep the feet dry.

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