Rosacea Pictures

Jun 22 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a very common erythematous, acne-like chronic dermatological condition that affects an estimated 45 million people worldwide.

Still, there is no particular cause that can sufficiently explain the pathogenesis of this disorder. It could be a pattern of genetic predisposition and environmental factors that has caused for it to arise. There is also a link connecting the condition to mites, sun exposure, medications that may cause blood vessel dilation, gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori.

The major clinical symptoms of rosacea consist of red patches, development of telangiectases, which are small blood vessels that form just under the skin surface, diffuse facial redness, red cysts, and pink or irritated eyes. These manifestations tend appear, then disappear for weeks, months or even years and then reappear.

It frequently begins with a tendency to go red much more easily than other people do. In time, individuals may see irreversible redness on the face.

Characteristically, the nose can become red and bumpy and develop visible dilated superficial blood vessels. If left untreated, later stages can bring a disfiguring nasal condition called rhinophyma, a condition described by a bulbous, enlarged red nose and puffy cheeks.

Currently, rosacea isn’t regarded as a curable disorder, but it can usually be managed with appropriate, standard treatments. With lasers, intense pulse light, photodynamic therapy and isotretinoin made available, some cases of this condition may be drastically cleared for a long time.

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Psoriasis Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a common T-cell-mediated autoimmune, persistent skin disorder, characterized by circumscribed patches of raised, thickened, red bumps covered with silvery-white, flaking scales. Naturally in the deepest layer of skin, there are new skin cells continuously being formed. From there, they ascend to the epidermal layer where dead surface cells are shed in a 28-day-process. In areas affected by psoriasis, however, the problem is new cells only need three to four days to reach the epidermal surface, leading to an increased epidermal cell turnover with marked thickening which causes the typical scaly plaques.

In almost all cases, the primary cause is unspecified. It is believed that activated T lymphocytes produce chemical messengers that stimulate abnormal growth of keratinocytes and dermal blood vessels. Other factors may be associated with heredity. Flare-ups may be elicited by infection, skin trauma and injury, stress, certain medications, corticosteroid withdrawal, alcohol and cold temperature and various environmental factors.

There is no known way to prevent psoriasis, and there is no cure either. The primary goal of treatment is to suppress the signs and symptoms of the disease. The treatment regimen depends on the severity of the condition as well as the patient’s age, history, compliance to therapy, and sex.

Exposure to sunlight improves many individuals with the condition. Maintaining the skin soft and well moisturized is effective. Application of heavy moisturizing creams can prevent skin dehydration especially when applied straight away after bathing. Never use irritating cosmetics and soaps. Do no scratching or skin rubbing or any aggressive action which can cause bleeding and irritation. Bath soaks with coal tar can eliminate and trim down the plaques. A physician-directed light therapy may be necessary.

The three fundamental modes of treatments for psoriasis are topical therapy, phototherapy and systemic therapy; all these therapies may well be used unaccompanied or in combination. Under topical therapy, the major remedies are corticosteroids, vitamin D-3 derivatives, coal tar and retinoids. In cases where psoriasis is extensive, as characterized by more itchy patches than can simply be counted, then UV-B light and PUVA are used. The third treatment mode is systemic therapy which includes drugs that are usually established after both topical treatment and light therapy have become unsuccessful.

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Pityriasis Rosea Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Pityriasis Rosea?

Pityriasis rosea is a non-dangerous skin rash but inflicts considerable distress on some people. It typically starts with a solitary mother patch lesion, and then after 1 to 2 weeks, a generalized body rash lasting about six weeks follows.

The cause is undefined but it suggests a viral infection as the culprit based on its clinical presentation and immunologic reactions. As evidence shows, there is viral reactivation of human herpes virus-6 and HHV-7 but this is not consistent to some other cases because no antibodies were identified. Adding to the controversy is the fact that HHV-7 is commonly found in healthy people.

In most of the reported cases, an upper respiratory tract infection comes first. Then, a single elliptical, red herald patches around 2 to 10 cm. emerges characteristically on the abdomen. On occasions, the mother patch may come out on hidden areas like in the armpit for instance. 7 to 14 days after the herald patch appeared, large daughter patches of red, egg-shaped rash come out on the upper body and can also appear in the mouth. On rare cases, an inverse distribution of the rash occurs mostly on the extremities. Generally, the red patches stretches broadly across the chest going by the rib-line in a Christmas-tree distribution. Several days later, small circular patches appear on the back, neck and on the cheeks. The prognosis is good, with patients recovering completely for only a matter of weeks or in some cases up to six months.

There is no definitive prevention as the cause is still undetermined. Similar with common viral infections, preventive measures include proper hygiene, frequent hand washing, avoiding crowded places and contact to people who cough and sneeze.

This skin condition usually goes away without treatment Antihistamines and topical corticosteroids provide relief from itching and improve the appearance of the rash. Steroids however may cause the new skin to take longer to tone with the surrounding skin color. Use only soap with moisturizer. Exposure to direct sunlight for about 10 to 15 minutes a day can help the lesions resolve quickly.

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Tinea Versicolor Pictures

Jun 20 2011 Published by admin under Uncategorized

What is Tinea Versicolor?

Dermatomycosis furfuracea, also called as Tinea versicolor is a condition distinguished by a rash on the trunk and proximal extremities, majorly caused by Malassezia globosa. This yeast is naturally living on the human skin and only becomes disruptive under special circumstances, including high temperature, weakened immunity, and hormonal abnormalities. It is assumed that the yeast feeds on lipids on top of dead skin cells.

Generally, oval-shaped spots with sharp borders roughly about ¼ to 1 inch in diameter often come into the skin surface together to form a bigger patch. Frequently affected body areas are the back, upper arm, torso, lower legs, armpit, and could also be show on the face. There is an infrequent fine scaling of the skin which gives an external ash-like scale. During a strenuous activity or in warm days, the body temperature is elevated. Sometimes when there is an elevation of the body temperature, pin-prick itching is felt in the affected areas. The warmer the temperature, the worse it gets. The distressing itch stops once sweating begins.

Pigmentary alterations occur. The term versicolor presents the detail that it brings about color shifts to the involved skin by either becoming lighter or darker than the adjacent skin surfaces. Commonly, people who have dark complexion will have hypopigmentation, while those with lighter skin tone will have hyperpigmentation. These temporary discolorations are termed as sun fungus.

For the treatment of tinea versicolor, wash and dry the affected skin area. A thin layer of antifungal agents are applied to the skin two times a day for less than 2 weeks. Some doctors prescribe the most economical yet effective treatment which is selenium sulfide shampoo to be applied for 10-15 minutes before rinsing; done twice a week for about 2 to 4 weeks. In severe, massive and recurring cases, Nizoral pills will eliminate the fungus and relieve any itch.

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